CD Review: The Prodigy – Invaders Must Die

The Prodigy define the crossover genre, whatever you think of them you cannot deny that more so than any other group of the last century The Prodigy have been able […]

The Prodigy define the crossover genre, whatever you think of them you cannot deny that more so than any other group of the last century The Prodigy have been able to access fans of hard dance, electro, rock and metal in new and unique ways with every album they put out and whilst this is no ‘Music For The Jilted Generation’ it is a pretty darn good effort and a great way for the group to access their roots but bring that influence forward into 2009.

rating-4

“We need the Prodigy right now in this age of recession and negativity, come and show us how to party lads”

 

The Prodigy define the crossover genre, whatever you think of them you cannot deny that more so than any other group of the last century The Prod have been able to access fans of hard dance, electro, rock and metal in new and unique ways with every album they’ve put out and whilst this is no ‘Music For The Jilted Generation’ it is a pretty darn good effort and a great way for the group to access their roots but bring that influence forward into 2009.

Opener and title track Invaders Must Die is a bombastic opener that smacks you in the face with all the confidence and style that we have come to expect from the genre-benders, hitting hard with massive bass and sledgehammer drum beats. This is the album’s big-beat dancefloor filler and party anthem built to make people move. Omen is the latest single and it’s a powerful statement and a true crossover anthem, its snottingly brilliant with its epic beats and thumping electronic soul beating at your chest. Thunder is heavy and soft in equal measure, the samples work well to compliment the solid and fast pace and soulful vocals by reggae master Brother Culture. Next up, Colours takes the disk into rockier territory, a track with a lot to say for itself, standing out as an emphatic declaration for the band that they are back and mean business with some trademark double snarl action from Keith Flint and Maxim complete with a pop-infused backbone. Take Me To The Hospital takes us back to the early days all whirlwind synths and rock hard beats ready for headbanging and glowsticks galore. Warrior’s Dance takes things up another notch in terms of mood, it’s a total rave tune which will beat inside your skull for hours and hours after the first listen. In a good way we see just how much Liam Howlett references the past on this record, as this track carries the same tone and infectious groove as No Good (start the dance) from 94. Run With The Wolves is our standout, it’s rock, metal and dance all rolled into one. Dave Grohl – the legendary drummer, takes up the sticks and adds a whole new dimension to this electro-rock- come cyberpunk beast. There’s something for everyone here, this one rocks very bloody hard, ladies and gentleman.

Urban Reprise uses the makings of earlier track Omen for some backing, it’s brooding, moody and acts as a kind of denouement for listeners to relax and get ready for Worlds On Fire is an extreme punch in the ears. Truly powerful and relevant to now, the three-piece show the wannabes how it’s done with some great samples and a nifty amalgamation of styles. Piranha comes out firing on all cylinders and switches the pace up a little; there is more focus on melody here with the emotive vocal qualities. The final track on here is Stand Up and it’s a sledgehammer blow to end the disk, working on the senses in a variety of ways. Elements of rock and electronica mesh neatly with what we will call euphoric beats to end on a real high note. We will never be as shocked as we were when the Prodigy first assaulted our ears and eyes way back when, but why would we want to be? We need the Prodigy right now in this age of recession and negativity, come and show us how to party lads!

****/5

For more information, visit the band’s Myspace and website.

Watch the video for new single Omen:

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