Album Review: Bring Me The Horizon – ‘AMO’

Years from their last studio album, deathcore originated band “Bring Me the Horizon” are back with an album that’s a crusade of diverse sounds, showing the world they can get […]

Years from their last studio album, deathcore originated band “Bring Me the Horizon” are back with an album that’s a crusade of diverse sounds, showing the world they can get away with anything.

After postponing their release of AMO from the 11th January to the 25th, as well as releasing the leading single Mantra, mid-2018, it’s safe to say this is one of the most anticipated albums of 2019 to date.

As a single Mantra was reminiscent of their That’s the Spirit album, almost misleading fans slightly as to what to expect from AMO, but, despite the mixture of sounds, from some heavy guitar-driven songs to the pop-rock that can be heard in Medicine; they did not disappoint. The album is constructed to showcase the idea of love and the extremes it inhibits and, by doing so, it takes you through a journey of love, anger, and remorse. 

AMO is soul – it has a way of both connecting and creating meaning to everyone – which is truly inspiring.  Each song gives a different vibe, with the album flowing from genre to genre – perhaps in an attempt to fit in with the demands of today’s idea of rock (since many deem deathcore or ‘screamo’ a burnt-out match). Oli and his band-mates have reached out and beyond, executing each style of rock, pop, dance and metal beautifully in a sense that may be surprising to long-lasting listeners.  The band is proving their diversification in the music scene – expanding their garden of skills and knowledge, planting whatever they want without listening to anyone’s hate.  Instead, they re-fuel from it, creating a life in the album that pulses through you with every beat, every lyric and every song. 

The themes and lyrics pumping throughout the album are heavier than 2015’s That’s The Sprit, bringing an album to the scene with a deeper meaning and variety to express the combination of emotions. The main theme that flows throughout is love – the album title itself being a nod towards the Spanish word for it, but more so, it’s about the painful repercussions and toxicity that love brings. Opening on the opinionated I Apologise If You Feel Something – the lyrics talk of someone saying to their significant other that they are in control of their own thoughts, feelings and emotions – this is in complete difference to Mantra which relates love to a cult and yet again, showcases their variation. Meanwhile, Medicine speaks words only someone who has rid themselves of poison from their life can say ‘…some people are a lot like clouds, you know / ’cause life’s so much brighter when they go…” 

Mother Tongue is the pure love song needed after previous weighted tracks – a tribute to a love so strong that they don’t have to say I love you as fala amo (love speaks).  The contrast highlights the journey people take after a tough break-up and, how life can get better afterwards. In The Dark however, is an intense, more pop inspired song that is detailed in Oli’s discovery of the infidelity of his previous partner – it’s from the perspective of the person being cheated and leaves a weight of sympathy on the listener’s shoulders. 

The final track I Don’t Know What to Say twinges with Oli’s respect and sorrow for a childhood friend he recently lost to cancer – its acoustic background is filled up at every beat with an orchestra that perfectly reflects the grief felt in losing a close friend.

Bring Me the Horizon has taken a massive risk in branching out from their heavy metal roots and, for that they should be commended.  However, some listeners may be resilient in listening to the new genre’s explored on AMO such as the more electro tunes of Fresh Bruises and Ouch – these songs may cause earlier fans to feel the need to blast their infamous Can you feel my Heart! There is even a line in the song Heavy Metal’ which states “…cause some kid on the gram/ said he used to be a fan/but this shit isn’t heavy metal…” which is Oli saying he is blatantly aware of the backlash the band will receive from deserting their origins. 

Despite the fact AMO is not the metal album fans were expecting, there are a few bangers for each individual which is what makes this so enticing. That’s the Spirit was BMTH’s trial, where they presented a new sound – something more pop-rock – but AMO is their new adventure, where they’re taking everything one step further. 

About Evie Madden

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