Album Review: Corbin – ‘MOURN’

Since Corbin, formerly known as ‘Spooky Black’s’ rapid ascension to the heights of underground hip hop around 2 years ago, he’s gone off radar. Well, aside from the all-round lacklustre body of work […]

Since Corbin, formerly known as ‘Spooky Black’s’ rapid ascension to the heights of underground hip hop around 2 years ago, he’s gone off radar. Well, aside from the all-round lacklustre body of work he mustered up with Bobby Raps mid-2015, he’s been suitably underground; furrowing deep into his psyche to retrieve some more of the most heartfelt and sincere monologue to ever be delivered over some of the most sombre sounds imaginable.  

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Hundreds and thousands of his devoted following mourned his departure, but this new album, appropriately and somewhat coincidentally titled ‘Mourn’ is allowing for further ascension. With his melancholy undertones, and powerful 80s synth vibes delivered on the album’s namesake single, Mourn, released a number of weeks prior, people have been craving the new material, and boy does this deliver.  

The album opens with ‘Ice Boy’, a song of which multiple meanings can be drawn. Corbin has always found a way of using the English language to simplify tricky situations, and to unintentionally ooze emotion. Whether it’s the small cracks in his voice when belting a chorus, or the barely comprehensive words mumbled when the vibe suddenly detours. His ability to allow you to feel his passion, but also his reality is quite remarkable.   

His team of producers have managed to marry both soul and hip-hop in a revolutionary way, allowing for a body of work which enables insight into the inner-workings of Corbin’s reclusive entourage. Being 17, as he was when he ventured into the musical abyss, we can see a clear change in the maturity of his voice and the relationship struggles he’s managed accumulate. This album for many, may be a safe haven. It may be somewhere to go in your head that isn’t so confusing, and so daunting. For 41 minutes and 26 seconds, you needn’t worry about your life, rather finding solace in his…. 

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